Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Dog fighting paraphernalia legislation moves forward in Baltimore City Council

Dog fighting paraphernalia legislation moves forward in Baltimore City Council

Dog fighting paraphernalia legislation moves forward in Baltimore City Council
WMAR Staff
5:47 PM, Nov 3, 2015

BALTIMORE - A City Council Committee passed legislation that would put people behind bars for possessing dog fighting paraphernalia.

As city law stands now, a person engaged in dog fighting can't be arrested and charged with that crime unless they're caught with dogs in the home. The leads to many people not being charged with dog fighting, even when evidence of the activity is found.

The legislation is supported by the Baltimore City State's Attorney's Office, the Baltimore City Health Department, Baltimore City Police and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.

It will now go to the full City Council for a full vote.

Dog fighting paraphernalia legislation moves forward in city council - ABC2News.com





-----------------------------------------------------------


New legislation could help put an end to dog fighting in Baltimore

Christian Schaffer
11:26 PM, Nov 2, 2015
8:19 AM, Nov 3, 2015


Tuesday in Baltimore City there will be a public hearing on a bill that would give police and animal control new tools to stop dog-fighting.

Right now it's possible for investigators to find every indication of a dog-fighting ring, and still not be able to make any arrests.

“There is right now a gap between dog-fighting and the paraphernalia. And oftentimes animals are being fought are not kept in the same place where the paraphernalia is,” said Katie Flory, Chairwoman of the Mayor's Anti-Animal Abuse Advisory Commission.

Paraphernalia like treadmills, "break sticks" used to un-clamp the jaws of fighting dogs.. and "rape stands" used to restrain aggressive female dogs, so they can be forced to breed.

Earlier this year Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake introduced a bill that would make that type of dog-fighting equipment illegal in Baltimore City.

The fine would be $1000 for each offense; it could also include jail time.

The public hearing on that bill in front of City's Council's Health Committee is scheduled to start Tuesday at 1:00.

No comments:

Post a Comment